DELPHIC FRATERNITY HISTORY

The Delphic Fraternity, Inc., also known as Delphic of Gamma Sigma Tau, is an autonomous organization represented by three undergraduate chapters in the State of New York and the Commonwealths of Pennsylvania and Virginia, two graduate chapters in New York City and Washington, D.C., and two alumni chapters in New Paltz and Binghamton, NY. Historically, the fraternity has chartered 14 chapters in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

 

The Delphic Fraternity was originally founded as the Delphic Society in 1871 at the Geneseo Normal School in upstate New York (today SUNY Geneseo.) The aim of the society was to "provide a means for more extended cultivation in thought and language, for social advancement and promotion of good fellowship."

 

The Delphic Society of Geneseo was a successor organization to the Delphic Society of Rochester, which was founded in 1850. The Delphic Society at Geneseo eventually became the Delphic Fraternity. The Delphic Fraternity is one of the oldest existing social fraternities in North America. According to Wikipedia's list of social fraternities, Delphic is the 31st oldest existing social fraternity in the U.S.A.

 

During the early 1900s, Delphic expanded to eight legendary chapters throughout New York and Pennsylvania. The Delphic chapter at the Cortland Normal School in NY (today SUNY Cortland) can trace its history to the formation of the Young Men's Debating Club in 1847. If the 1847 organizational founding date is considered, the fraternity would be the 16th oldest in the country. Organizationally, the Delphic Fraternity represents more than 170 years of history.

 

The Delphic aims, circa 1922, were "to create an interest in good literature; to strengthen moral character; and to promote social welfare through the true spirit of brotherhood."  

 

By the late 1930s, only one of the original eight chapters remained officially active: the distinguished Zeta chapter at the New Paltz Normal School (today SUNY New Paltz,) the oldest fraternity at New Paltz tracing its history back to 1889. In the early 1950s, the New Paltz chapter was briefly associated with the national organization of Sigma Tau Gamma. In 1962 the Delphic Fraternity at New Paltz was incorporated in the state of New York.

 

Delphic of Gamma Sigma Tau Fraternity

 

In 1987, after about 15 years of dormancy, the Zeta chapter at SUNY New Paltz was re-established as Delphic of Gamma Sigma Tau Fraternity. It is the second fraternity in the nation to officially promote multicultural diversity within collegiate institutions and the first truly multicultural fraternity to be formed on the East Coast.

 

Mission Statement: This organization honorably pursues the sustained dignity, equality, and unity amonGST all races and creeds.

 

The Theta chapter of Delphic was formed at Binghamton University in 2003. The Kappa chapter of the fraternity was formed in 2009 at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, VA.

 

The Tau Alpha graduate chapter in New York City and the Tau Beta graduate chapter in Washington, D.C. were formed in 2014. In 2016, two undergraduate associate chapters were formed at SUNY Delhi and Lincoln University in Pennsylvania.

 

"The few, the proud... Delphic."

 

For questions or comments about this website, contact the Delphic Historian. To form a new or re-establish a former chapter of Delphic, contact the Executive Board. Visit the organization's official website at http://delphic-gst.org.

 

 

"Friendship, Fellowship, and Fidelity." 

Delphic of Gamma Sigma Tau Fraternity, originally founded in 1871, re-established in 1987. 

HISTORY STATEMENT - 1871 to the present
1901 Photo of the Zeta Chapter of Delphic at New Paltz, NY.

 1901 Photo of the Zeta Chapter of Delphic at at New Paltz, NY. 

The Delphic Society was founded on October 13, 1871, at the Geneseo Normal School in upstate New York (today SUNY Geneseo.)  The founding members of the literary debating society were John B. Abbott, Charles W. Barney, John N. Drake, Erastus P. Gates, William Janes, William Kershner, Scott L. McNinch, James M. Milne, William J. Milne, Loring Olmsted, Frank E. Welles, Ara Wilkinson, and Frank Winnie.

 

William J. Milne, the first principal of the Geneseo Normal School, was instrumental in the founding of the Delphic Society at Geneseo. While an undergraduate at the University of Rochester, Milne was a member of the Delphic Society at Rochester. He participated in the literary society's last public debate in 1866. William Milne wanted to provide students at the Geneseo Normal School with a literary societal experience similar to the one he participated in while at Rochester. The Delphic Society at Rochester, which was founded in 1850, was the predecessor organization to the Delphic Society at Geneseo founded in 1871.

 

With affiliations at other normal schools, the college literary society at Geneseo became known as The Delphic Fraternity. Delphic eventually became a statewide fraternity with chapters at Oneonta, Jamaica, Cortland, New Paltz, Plattsburgh, Potsdam, NY and Mansfield, Pennsylvania.

 

The Delphic chapter with the longest history is the Epsilon chapter at SUNY Cortland which can trace its history back to the formation of the Young Men's Debating Club (YMDC) in 1847. At the time, the YMDC boasted of being one of the oldest debating clubs in the United States.

 

By the late 1930s, only the Zeta chapter at SUNY New Paltz remained officially active.

 

The historic Zeta chapter of Delphic was founded at the New Paltz Normal School in 1899. In the 1950s, the chapter had a brief affiliation with the national organization of Sigma Tau Gamma. In 1962, the organization became a legal not-for-profit membership entity by initially incorporating as The Delphic Fraternity of New Paltz, Inc.

 

In the early 1970s, because of turbulent times and the decline of student interest in Greek life, the chapter became inactive. In the fall of 1986, twelve young men became interested in re-establishing the Delphic Fraternity. They were also interested in creating the first multicultural Greek letter organization at SUNY New Paltz. At the time, only predominantly white and predominantly black organizations existed on campus.

 

Of the twelve men interested in re-establishing Delphic, five were white, five where Latino, one was African-American and one was Asian-American. With hard work and determination, the group reactivated a historic organization and created the most culturally diverse fraternity at New Paltz. On March 11, 1987, the College at New Paltz fully recognized Delphic of Gamma Sigma Tau Fraternity.   

 

Since 1987, the fraternity has promoted multiculturalism via community events, workshops and forums, and relationships with culturally diverse student and Greek letter organizations. We have also incorporated multicultural themes into our membership process and actively recruit members of diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds. Since the 1960s Delphic brothers have culturally been of African, Asian, Caribbean, Eurasian, European, Latino, and Middle Eastern descent.   

 

In 2003, the Theta chapter at Binghamton University was founded, becoming the first Delphic chapter established in the 21st century. In 2009 the Kappa chapter was formed at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, VA. making it the first chapter to be chartered outside the Northeast Region.

 

In 2014, the Tau Alpha and Tau Beta graduate chapters were formed in New York City and Washington, D.C. In 2016, two undergraduate associate chapters were formed at SUNY Delhi and Lincoln University in Pennsylvania.

 

The organization is incorporated as The Delphic Fraternity, Inc., and does business as Delphic of Gamma Sigma Tau Fraternity. Delphic of Gamma Sigma Tau Fraternity is one of the oldest independent fraternities in the country and the first official multicultural fraternity formed on the East Coast. We are pioneers in the concept of multicultural Greek life and will continue to promote our Delphic history and the idea of multiculturalism well into the 21st century.    

 

For a much more in-depth understanding of the history of the Delphic Fraternity, you can read the updated Delphic Fraternity History e-Book, released on April 2, 2017. It outlines the history of the fraternity from 1847 to the present day. You can download a copy of it here

Delphic Video - 25th Re-Establishing Anniversary Dinner

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 History e-Book download

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HISTORY OF DELPHIC FRATERNITY CHAPTERS

SUNY Geneseo - The Alpha chapter of The Delphic Fraternity was founded in 1871 with the creation of the Delphic Society at the Normal School in Geneseo, NY. With the 1889 expansion to the Oneonta Normal School, the organization first became known as The Delphic Fraternity. The alpha chapter of Delphic at Geneseo remained officially active until 1938.

 

SUNY Oneonta - The Beta chapter of Delphic was formed in 1889 in Oneonta, NY. It was originally formed earlier that year as the Young Men's Debating Club. The chapter hosted several Delphic Banquets where members across the region would meet to discuss fraternity business and build upon their brotherhood. The beta chapter of Delphic became inactive in 1910 due to a low male membership at the Oneonta Normal School.

 

Jamaica Normal School - It is estimated that the Gamma chapter of Delphic was formed at the Jamaica Normal School in Jamaica, NY in 1897. Jamaica may be considered the "lost chapter" of Delphic because no actual mention of the fraternity is found anywhere in the limited history of the school. The chapter's last historical reference appeared in a local newspaper in 1916. Unlike the other normal schools, the Jamaica Normal School did not evolve into an institution of higher learning. It existed until the early 1930s.

 

Mansfield University - The Delta chapter of Delphic was formed in 1898 at the Normal School in Mansfield, PA. The Delta chapter is the first to be established outside of New York State. In 1914 the principal of the normal school disbands the fraternity. He felt Greek letter societies were elitist and wanted to create a sense of equality on campus. The last official pledge class of the Delta chapter of Delphic was initiated in 1915.

 

SUNY Cortland - The Epsilon chapter of Delphic was formed in 1899 in Cortland, NY. The chapter originated as the Young Men's Debating Club (YMDC,) which was formed at the Cortland Academy in 1847. The YMDC boasted of being one of the oldest debating clubs in the United States. The Delphic Fraternity founded the school newspaper, The Normal News, in 1878. The Delphic chapter at Cortland became inactive in 1917 because of the First World War.

 

SUNY New Paltz - The merger of two local fraternities at the New Paltz Normal School formed the Zeta chapter of Delphic in 1899. Alpha Pi Nu, founded in 1889 as the first men's fraternity at New Paltz, joined forces with Kappa Delta Alpha, formed in 1896, to become the Zeta chapter of The Delphic Fraternity. For a few years in the early 1950s, it affiliated itself with the national organization of Sigma Tau Gamma. A state law later banned all fraternities from having national affiliations. The New Paltz chapter became local again and briefly was a member of a confederation of local Sig Tau chapters. The Delphic chapter at SUNY New Paltz was active until 1972 when interest in Greek life faded because of the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam Conflict. The Zeta chapter was re-established as Delphic of Gamma Sigma Tau Fraternity in 1987, officially forming the first multicultural fraternity on the east coast. In 2004 the undergraduate chapter became inactive, however, it still operates periodically as an alumni chapter hosting several alumni events per year.

 

SUNY Plattsburgh - The Eta chapter was formed in 1900 when Alpha Kappa Sigma, an independent literary society at the Plattsburgh Normal School, became part of the Delphic Fraternity. The chapter remained active through 1907. Until 2003, it was believed that Plattsburgh was the last of the original chapters of Delphic formed in the late 19th/early 20th centuries.

 

SUNY Potsdam - In 1906, the Roger Baconian Society (which traces its origin back to 1870) was incorporated as the original Theta chapter of The Delphic Fraternity. Locally the group continued to operate as a college literary society but was known as the Roger Baconian chapter of the organization. The group was named after an English scientist and philosopher. Potsdam is considered the "newfound" chapter of Delphic because the organization only became aware of the chapter's historical association in 2003. The Baconian chapter of Delphic at Potsdam ceased to exist around the early 1930s.

 

Binghamton University - In 2003, the first Delphic chapter to be formed in the 21st century was chartered at Binghamton University. Since the organization was unaware of the former existence of the Potsdam chapter, it designated Binghamton the Theta chapter. Because the chapter at Potsdam preferred to be called the Baconian chapter of Delphic, the Binghamton chapter kept its Theta chapter designation. The Theta chapter became inactive in 2010, however, alumni are still active within the organization.

 

University of Virginia - In 2009, the Kappa chapter was formed at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, VA. Delphic of Gamma Sigma Tau is the first multicultural fraternity to be formed at UVA. The chapter is also the first to be established outside the Northeast and provides the Delphic Fraternity with a solid presence in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

 

New York City - In 2014, the Tau Alpha graduate professional chapter was formed in New York City. It is the first graduate chapter of the Delphic Fraternity.

 

Washington, D.C. - In 2014, the Tau Beta graduate professional chapter was formed in Washington, D.C. It is the second graduate chapter of the Delphic Fraternity.

 

SUNY Delhi - In 2016, an undergraduate associate chapter was formed at the State University of New York at Delhi.

 

Lincoln University - In 2016, an undergraduate associate chapter was formed at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania.

 

1847 - The Young Men's Debating Club, the origin of the Epsilon chapter of Delphic in Cortland, NY, is formed at the Cortland Academy.  

 

1850 - The Delphic Society at Rochester, the predecessor organization to the Delphic Society at Geneseo, is founded.

 

1870 - The Baconian Society, the precursor organization to the Baconian chapter of Delphic in Potsdam, NY, is founded.

 

1871 - The Delphic Society, the origin of the Delphic Fraternity, is founded in Geneseo, NY on October 13, 1871.

 

1876 - The Baconian Society at Potsdam divides into the Francis and Roger Baconian Societies.

 

1889 - The Delphic Fraternity is formed with the addition of the Beta chapter of Delphic in Oneonta, NY.  Alpha Pi Nu, the origin of the Zeta chapter at New Paltz, is founded.

 

1896 - Kappa Delta Alpha, which helped form the Zeta chapter at New Paltz, is founded.

 

1897 - The Gamma chapter of Delphic is founded in Jamaica, NY.

 

1898 - The Delta chapter of Delphic in Mansfield, PA is founded.

 

1899 - The Young Men's Debating Club in Cortland becomes the Epsilon chapter of the Delphic Fraternity.  Alpha Pi Nu and Kappa Delta Alpha at New Paltz merge to form the Zeta chapter of the Delphic Fraternity.

 

1900 - Alpha Kappa Sigma society at Plattsburgh, NY becomes the Eta chapter of Delphic.

 

1906 - The Roger Baconian Society at Potsdam becomes the Baconian chapter of the Delphic Fraternity.

 

1951-1954 - The Zeta chapter of Delphic at New Paltz becomes the Alpha Rho chapter of Sigma Tau Gamma, a nationally recognized fraternity.

 

1962 - The Delphic Fraternity of New Paltz, Inc. is incorporated as a not-for-profit corporation in the State of New York.

 

1967 - Delphic at New Paltz attends a social convention in Oneonta of former Sig Tau affiliated chapters in NY.

 

1987 - The Zeta chapter of Delphic at New Paltz is re-established on March 11, 1987, as a multicultural fraternity known as  Delphic of Gamma Sigma Tau.

 

1992 - The Delphic Alumni Association is formed at the Zeta chapter in New Paltz, NY.

 

1998 - Delphic of Gamma Sigma Tau Fraternity becomes a founding member of the National Multicultural Greek Council.

 

2003 - The Theta chapter of Delphic is founded in Binghamton, NY.

 

2004 - The Delphic Fraternity of New Paltz, Inc. becomes The Delphic Fraternity, Inc. and files a d/b/a as Delphic of Gamma Sigma Tau Fraternity.

 

2009 - The Kappa chapter of Delphic is founded at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, VA.

 

2014 - The Tau Alpha and the Tau Beta graduate chapters are respectively formed in New York City and Washington, D.C.

 

2016 - Two associate chapters were formed at SUNY Delhi and Lincoln University in Oxford, Pennsylvania. On October 13, 2016, The Delphic Fraternity, Inc. became 145 years old.

 

2017 - The Delphic Fraternity Gamma Sigma Tau History e-Book: 145 years of Brotherhood, Over 165 Years of History, is published online.

 

DELPHIC FRATERNITY TIMELINE
THE DELPHIC SOCIETY

The Delphic Fraternity officially originates with the founding of the Delphic Society at the Geneseo State Normal School in upstate New York (known today as SUNY Geneseo.)  The Delphic Society at Geneseo was founded on October 13, 1871. With the 1889 chapter expansion to the Oneonta Normal School (today SUNY Oneonta,) the Delphic Society first became known as the Delphic Fraternity.

 

We knew the origins of the Delphic Society at Geneseo predated that of the Alpha Chapter of the fraternity. Because of the historic popular mention of the Delphic Oracle and the City of Delphi, there were other college literary societies in the United States called the Delphic Society. However, there was no clear link to connect the Delphic Society at Geneseo with any other another organization until recently.

 

In late 2016, we were finally able to confirm the following: William J. Milne, the first principal of the Geneseo State Normal School, attended the University of Rochester as an undergraduate. Milne, who was instrumental in the founding of the Delphic Society at Geneseo, participated in the last public debate of the Delphic Society at the University of Rochester in 1866.

 

It is now evident to us that William J. Milne wanted to provide students at the Geneseo Normal School with a literary societal experience similar to the one he was a part of while at Rochester. Therefore, the Delphic Society at Rochester, which was founded in 1850, was the predecessor organization to the Delphic Society at Geneseo founded in 1871. The Delphic Society that originated in Geneseo exists today as the Delphic Fraternity, also known as Delphic of Gamma Sigma Tau.

 

In summation, the Delphic Fraternity was originally founded as the Delphic Society in Geneseo in 1871. The seminal concept for the Delphic Society at Geneseo stems from the Delphic Society at Rochester, which was founded on November 2, 1850.

 

For more information about the Delphic Society at Rochester, visit its Wikipedia Page.

 

The Predecessor Organization to the Delphic Fraternity

DELPHIC GALLERY
COMPOSITES
NOTABLE DELPHIC ALUMNI

John B. Abbott - This Founding Father of the Delphic Fraternity was a New York county judge, the first president of the Livingston County Bar Association, and a State Democratic Leader.

 

Heinz Ahlmeyer, Jr. - A United States Post Office, a community college scholarship, an athletic award, and a varsity soccer game are named after this Delphic alumnus who lost his life during the Vietnam War.

 

William George Butler - World-famous musician, composer, and one of the founders of the Delta chapter of the Delphic Fraternity at Mansfield, Pennsylvania.

 

Rowland L. Davis - New York State Supreme Court Justice.

 

Henry Albert Dickinson - New York State Assembly Member who helped draft the city charter of Cortland, NY.

 

Dr. John H. Doane - A building at Mansfield University is named after this physician and his family.

 

Arthur J. Gmeiner - Businessman, artist, and philanthropist.

 

Alfred Harcourt - Founder of the Harcourt Publishing Company who worked with some of the most famous writers of the 20th Century.

 

Louis Jay Heath - Foreign correspondent for United Press International and one of the first organizers of the American Newspaper Guild.

 

R. Paul Higgins - A residence hall on the SUNY Cortland campus is named after this Delphic who was a prominent physician and higher education officer.

 

Clayton R. Lusk - The Lusk Field House at SUNY Cortland is named after this New York State Senator and Acting Lieutenant Governor of New York mostly remembered as chairman of the "Lusk Committee."

 

James M. Milne - The library at SUNY Oneonta is named after this Founding Father of Delphic who was the first principal of the Oneonta Normal School.

 

William J. Milne - This Founding Father was an educator, academic administrator, and author known for heading two teachers' colleges in New York State and writing numerous mathematics textbooks.

 

Charles T. Saxton - American Civil War Veteran, New York State Senator, and Lieutenant Governor of New York.

 

David Eugene Smith - Mathematician, educator, and editor considered one of the founders of the field of mathematics education.

 

George B. Strait - A planetarium at Mansfield University is named after this popular professor.

 

Harold G. Strait - A state highway is named after this prominent resident of Mansfield, Pennsylvania.

 

Frank E. Welles - This Founding Father was a prominent professor at SUNY Geneseo and former Superintendent of the Utica City School District.

Dr. Frank Ephraim Welles, a prominent resident of the Geneseo, NY community, was born in New York State in April 1852. He was a member of the senior class of the Brockport Normal School before deciding to transfer in 1871 to the newly opened Geneseo State Normal School in Geneseo, NY. Normal schools were institutions of higher learning specializing in the education and training of teachers. While at Geneseo, Frank E. Welles became a founding member of the Delphic Fraternity and was elected its first president.

 

Frank Welles was part of the first graduating class of students of the Geneseo Normal School in 1872. After graduation, Welles taught at the local high school in Nunda, NY and later became the school's principal.  He eventually rose to become the Superintendent of the Utica City School District in Utica, NY.

 

Welles received his bachelor's degree from Illinois Wesleyan University in 1886. In 1889, after his work in Utica, Welles accepted a teaching position at the Geneseo Normal School (today SUNY Geneseo.) There he chaired the Department of Classics where he taught Latin and Greek. He then became a dedicated hardworking assistant principal and remained with the Geneseo State Normal School for 23 years. He earned his master's degree in 1893 from his alma mater Illinois Wesleyan University and his degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Ohio Wesleyan University.

 

Frank Welles was one of the leaders of the community Presbyterian Church, was a member of the National Educational Association, the Livingston County Historical Society, and the Freemasons, holding the title of Grand Master Mason of his local lodge in 1895 and 1896.

 

After retiring from education in 1922, Dr. Welles became a farmer in Schenectady, NY and died on April 13, 1927, in Great Neck, NY. He was survived by his wife Cornelia and their four children; James, Mary, Colin, and Frank Jr.

 

 

 

Sources:

Death of Prof. Welles, Livingston Democrat, Geneseo Livingston County New York, April 20, 1927.

Dr. Frank E. Welles Dies, New York Times Obituary, April 14, 1927.

1890 Report of the State Superintendent, Volume 36, By New York State Department of Public Instruction.

1890-1891 Annual Catalogue By Illinois Wesleyan University.

1903 Yearbook and List of Active Members of the National Educational Association.

18th Annual Meeting of the Livingston County Historical Society, Volumes 16-25, January 16, 1894.

Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, Volume 129 By Freemasons. Grand Lodge of the State of New York, May 1910.

1910 United States Census Data.

 

Founder and First President of the Delphic Fraternity.

DR. FRANK E. WELLES
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Alfred Harcourt (1881-1954) was the first president of the historic Zeta Chapter of Delphic at New Paltz, NY. His family was one of the first to settle in the small town in Ulster County. Harcourt was the son of Gertrude M. Elting and Charles M. Harcourt. Alfred grew up in the same stone house his family lived in since 1720. Harcourt's father was a fruit farmer who earned his living by selling his produce to local markets in the New York City area, about 90 miles south of New Paltz.   

 

Alfred Harcourt was born on January 31, 1881. When he was nine years old, Alfred became ill and spent an entire year out of school. To help past the time, his parents encouraged him to read books and magazines. He later attended the New Paltz Normal School.

 

Alfred became a member of the Kappa Delta Alpha Fraternity, which was founded in 1896. In 1899, KDA merged with another local fraternity on campus, Alpha Pi Nu, founded in 1889, to form the Zeta chapter of the statewide Delphic Fraternity. Harcourt was elected its first chapter president. The fraternity sponsored literary lectures, political and social debates, and other community activities.

 

After graduating from the New Paltz, Alfred Harcourt attended Columbia University where he met Donald Brace. The two went on to jobs in publishing firms and eventually co-founded their own: Harcourt Brace and Company. The publishing company became very successful over time, signing famous authors like Sinclair Lewis, Carl Sandburg, George Orwell, Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, and E.E. Cummings. Soon Harcourt Brace and Company became a publishing powerhouse representing some of the world's most recognized writers of the time. Harcourt was president of Harcourt Brace from its founding in 1919 through 1942 when he retired due to illness.

 

Alfred Harcourt died on June 20, 1954, at the age of 73. His second wife Ellen Knowles Harcourt founded the Alfred Harcourt Foundation in 1962. The foundation provides college scholarships to deserving students at various colleges and universities across the country. Harcourt remained on the board of directors of Harcourt Brace and Company until his death.

 

The tributes to Alfred Harcourt recognized him as one of the great publishers of the 20th century. For many years the company he founded was known to others in the publishing industry simply by the name "Harcourt."

 

Harcourt's legacy lives on today within the Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

 

"When I started Harcourt Brace and Company, I expected to have a lot of fun, and I hoped to build a sound, small business which would give me a decent living." -- Alfred Harcourt.

 

 

Sources:

Alfred Harcourt, 73, A Former Publisher, New York Times Obit, June 21, 1954.

Alfred Harcourt, 73, Dies; Founded Publishing House, New York Herald Tribune, June 22, 1954.

In a Valley Fair: A History of the State University College of Education at New Paltz, by Elizabeth Lang and Robert Lang, New York, 1960.

The History of Harcourt Brace and Company: 75 Years of Publishing Excellence, by Harcourt, Inc., Orlando, FL, 1994.

Harcourt Publishing Wikipedia Page.

Images of Harcourt courtesy of the Sojourner Truth Library Historic Photograph Collection, the Normal Review Student Newspaper of New Paltz, and the Columbia University Archives.

 

The First President of the Zeta Chapter of Delphic at New Paltz.

 

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ALFRED HARCOURT
MARINE LIEUTENANT HEINZ AHLMEYER, JR

Feb. 6, 1944 - May 10, 1967

Delphic Brother Heinz Ahlmeyer Jr. became a member of the fraternity around 1964. He graduated from New Paltz in 1966 then enlisted in the military. Heinz was reported missing in action during the Vietnam Conflict. He was a Marine Lieutenant who was presumed dead on May 10, 1967, his first day of duty in Vietnam.

 

Heinz Ahlymeyer was a native of Pearl River, NY and attended Rockland Community College prior to graduating from SUNY New Paltz.

 

Heinz was an exceptional athlete who participated in several sports during his time at New Paltz. His positive attitude was a major factor in each team's overall success. The college named an award in his honor.

 

The Heinz Ahlmeyer Award is presented each year to the New Paltz athlete whose "dedication, perseverance, and service beyond self has been an inspiration to both his/her teammates and fellow students."

 

In January 2005, Heinz's remains were officially identified and he was finally honored with a memorial service at Arlington National Cemetery on May 10, 2005, 38 years to the day he was reported missing.

 

During the 2005 Alumni Weekend at SUNY New Paltz, the college commemorated Heinz's sacrifice at a special ceremony that included Delphic alumni and members of his soccer team. The October event was held in recognition of his service to the college community and to his country. Ironically, the discovery of Heinz's remains coincided with the 40th anniversary of his soccer team's 1965 championship victory.  

 

In November 2005, United States Congressman Eliot Engel presented a bill to rename the U.S. Post Office in Pearl River, NY after Heinz. Congress passed the bill, which officially named the Pearl River post office the Heinz Ahlmeyer, Jr. Post Office Building.

 

In 2007, Rockland Community College recognized Heinz, who attended Pearl River High School and was a member of the wrestling team at RCC, by establishing the Heinz Ahlmeyer Memorial Scholarship for new students.  

 

An annual varsity soccer game at SUNY New Paltz is also named after Heinz Ahlmeyer Jr.

 

"The New Paltz college community was clearly enriched by Heinz Ahlmeyer's presence on this campus," said Steven Poskanzer, president of SUNY New Paltz. "He touched so many lives here and is remembered with great affection and honor. We hope that what we do now can convey our gratitude to his family and ensure that his spirit will always be very much alive at New Paltz."

 

 

Sources:

News Pulse Archive

SUNY New Paltz Ahlmeyer Fact Sheet

Arlington National Cemetery Website

MidHudsonNews.com

Taskforce Omega Website

Various News/Reports on Heinz

U.S. Post Office (Pearl River, New York) Wikipedia page

RCC Scholarships for New Students

Photo courtesy of the Arlington National Cemetery.

American Battle Monuments Commission

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